Influential History

This mountain retreat has seen adventurers pioneer the “Land of the Sky” since William Davidson settled as the first non-indigenous family in 1785. Eden Land renamed Asheville in honor of Governor Samuel Ashe in 1797 became a financial and military hub of North Carolina serving as a strategic Confederate military center during the Civil War. In its peak, renowned dignitaries, writers and celebrities sought its therapeutic mountain air.

 

Eclectic Architecture

The advent of the railroad attracted the Vanderbilts, whose lavish country retreat dominates as America’s Largest Home®, Biltmore House. The 1920s brought about boom and bust for Asheville ultimately preserving its architectural legacy with a mix of Neoclassical, Art Deco, and Beaux Arts styles along the Architecture Trail, complementing today’s edgy energy emanating from contemporary shops and art galleries.

Authentic Lifestyle

Beyond the communal dedication to outdoor living, Asheville's music and arts scene stems from age-old traditions inspired by the mountain landscape. Al fresco amphitheaters, intimate music halls, and iconic venues entice locals and guests alike. The Downtown and River Arts Districts represent a myriad of artists celebrating Western North Carolina's cultural heritage. Indulge as the sights and sounds of Asheville sink into your soul. 

Delectable Dining

Known as Foodtopia, Asheville’s culinary scene caters to all tastes from Southern culinary staples at Biscuit Head, healthful bowls at Tupelo Honey, specialized Cúrate tapas, or French Broad Chocolate Lounge to cure your sweet tooth. Known for more than its cultural cuisine, Asheville has been touted as Beer City with more breweries per capita than any other city in the U.S. From well-known New Belgium to funky favorite Bhramari Brewing and old-school Asheville Brewing Company, you’re bound to find a local brew that delights your palate. 

Natural Landscapes

Rugged mountains, hardwood forests and crystal-clear waterways create the natural sanctuary that has drawn explorers to Asheville for centuries. Within and beyond city limits the region offers spectacular diversity of regional wildlife, vegetation, and geology. Although wondrously scenic in the snow, the best times to visit Asheville are from March to May and September to early November, when temperatures hover between the upper 50s and the mid-70s – ideal weather for exploring the blooms in spring and the foliage in the fall.

 

Unforgettable Excursions

Spanning the southern and central Appalachian Mountains, the 469-mile Blue Ridge Parkway connects Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park to Great Smoky National Park in North Carolina. Along the journey scenic viewpoints, magnificent waterfalls and leisurely hikes in Pisgah National Forest are invitingly accessible. For the more intrepid traveler, the area boasts a bounty of outdoor activities. Fly high on a speeding zip-line or stay closer to the ground canyoneering; hit the trails cycling or make your way on the water kayaking or white-water rafting.